Ornamental & Fruit Trees

prunus shogetsu

Every Garden needs a tree and the Prunus family offers a wide range of beautiful, interesting varieties that are the perfect choice for any number of situations. With over 400 varieties in the genus including cultivated almond, peach, plum, cherry and apricot, whether you are looking for a tree that provides early spring blossom; a bountiful fruit crop or stunning ornamental bark, there will be something for you in the Prunus family.

Here at Larch Cottage we supply old and new varieties that thrive in a number of growing conditions. If you are searching for a self-fertile, fruiting tree that is suitable for colder, more exposed areas then Prunus ‘Summer sun’ Colt AGM would be an ideal choice. Its compact growth habit also means it is suitable for those with limited space: it can even be grown in a pot on the patio! If you prefer a small tree with a wider spread then Prunus ‘Shogestsu’ (Blushing Bride) AGM, would be an excellent choice; its small, wide-spreading branches form a broad, flattened crown and mid-late season large, double flowers, and attractive bark make it a stunning specimen tree in the garden.

In our collection you will discover a wonderful range of blossom, from the rich, deep pink of Prunus ‘Kursar’ AGM, through to the delicate, pale pink blossom of Prunus ‘Hokusai’ and the large white blooms of Prunus ‘Chocolate Ice’ ( Matsumae-fuki)  AGM. If it is stunning, ornamental bark you are looking for, then Prunus Serrula AGM or ‘Birch Bark Cherry’ with its impressive, mahogany coloured, peeling bark would be an ideal choice.

You can also select from a fabulous range of fruiting cherry trees including older varieties such as Avium ‘Van’, with its large, firm, true black fruits and fruiting fan-trained trees such as ‘Sunburst’: a self-fertile variety that produces large, sweet, black-red berries in July.

So if you are looking for a stunning ornamental tree, or a fruiting tree that can provide both beauty and bounty, then our extensive collection of Prunus would be a great place to start.

Blog post written by Jo Chamberlain

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